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April 11, 2007

Join us on April 19
Sneak peek of a new Lifetime movie, “A Life Interrupted.”
Come get a sneak peek of “A Life Interrupted,” a new Lifetime movie starring Lea Thompson who plays Debbie Smith, a survivor of rape who went on to successfully lobby Congress to pass anti-rape legislation designed to eliminate the backlog of untested DNA kits. Chicago Foundation for Women, the Voices and Faces Project and Lifetime invite 30 people to join us.
Thursday, April 19
6:30 p.m.
6th floor film, MDA City Apartments
63 E. Lake St., Chicago
RSVP: call (312) 577-2801 ext. 229 or email rsvp@cfw.org.
IN THE NEWS

Follow-up: Don Imus outrage
Today, MSNBC pulled from their television line-up the broadcast of shock jock Don Imus’ morning radio show. Imus today met privately with the Rutgers women’s basketball team he verbally assaulted on air last Wednesday. We believe the suspension is a slap on the wrist and is not enough. View a copy of the letter we sent to CBS and get the address and phone numbers where you can tell CBS what you think. Help us stand up for women of all races, sexualities and gender identities by asking for Imus’ show to be canceled.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Staff changes
We haven’t yet touched on two major resignations in the federal government, nor has there been much in the media—unless you’re reading blogs.
  • Eric Keroack, the anti-choice, abstinence-only doctor appointed to head the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ family planning office, abruptly resigned on March 29. The Associated Press said he stepped down after a Medicaid lawsuit was filed against his private practice in Massachusetts. No further details were available. In January, Foundation Board Chair Lois Lipton wrote to President Bush asking him to withdraw Keroack’s nomination because his “unscientific and extreme statements do not advance the goals of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor provide accurate guidance to low-income families in our country.” Lipton urged the president to choose a candidate that would be better suited to lead this crucial office with $283 million in funds for birth control, pregnancy tests, breast cancer screening and other health services for more than 5 million low-income women annually. Now we have that chance.

  • Also leaving the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services was Wade Horn, assistant secretary for children and families, who resigned April 8 from the job he has held since 2001. He is leaving to become a consultant. But whatever the reasons, his departure is applauded by women’s rights groups. His office oversees 65 programs with a $46 billion budget. And during his tenure much of the money he funneled towards “fathers only” programs, marriage counseling and abstinence-only education—his core issues. We also see this as a great opportunity for the President to appoint someone who understands public health and respects reproductive rights.
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